London Gatwick Delayed Flight Compensation

According to Regulation (EC) 261/2004 air passenger rights, passengers are entitled to compensation of up to €600 for delayed, cancelled or overbooked flights.

London Gatwick
IATA LGW
ICAO EGKK

London Gatwick, also known as London Gatwick, is a major international airport near Crawley in West Sussex, southeast England, 29.5 miles (47.5 km) south of Central London. It is the second-busiest airport by total passenger traffic in the United Kingdom, after Heathrow Airport. Gatwick is the eighth-busiest airport in Europe.

Gatwick opened as an aerodrome in the late 1920s; it has been in use for commercial flights since 1933. The airport has two terminals, the North Terminal and the South Terminal, which cover areas of 98,000 m2 (117,000 sq yd) and 160,000 m2 (190,000 sq yd) respectively. It operates as a single-runway airport, using a main runway with a length of 3,316 m (10,879 ft). A secondary runway is available but, due to its proximity to the main runway, can only be used if that is out of use. In 2018, 46.1 million passengers passed through the airport. As of 2019, Gatwick is the second busiest airport in the world to only operate one runway (after Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj International Airport) with a passenger use of 46 million in 2018.

City: London
Country: United Kingdom

London Gatwick delayed flight / cancelled flight / overbooked flight compensation

When are you entitled to flight compensation?

  • Flight cancelled without prior notification of 14 days from airline;
  • Flight delayed to arrive at the final destination over 3 hours;
  • Denied boarding due to overbooking;

Your flight must fall within EU:

Your flight departed from an airport at an EU country.

OR

Your flight landed in EU:

Your flight didn’t originate in the EU. However, the flight was operated by an EU-registered carrier and landed at an airport in the EU.

How much can you get in compensation for flights disrupted at London Gatwick?

Flight compensation depends on flight distance:

  • up to 1,500 km or less: up to €250
  • between 1,500 – 3,500 km: up to €400
  • more than 3500 km: up to €600

When are you not entitled to flight compensation?

Incidents at London Gatwick

Gone are the days of aviation when a shed and a grassy field were enough to operate an airplane. These days, airports are vast structures that are filled with passengers and personnel. And sometimes, things go wrong.

Neither the airport nor the airline can be held responsible if you flight was disrupted due to war or political crisis. They can’t control terrorist actions, either. As the same time, it’s hard to predict when any of the sensitive equipment at the airport will break down. Usually, a botched landing can damage lights and markings on the runway, but there can be other incidents, too.

Regulation (EC) 261/2004 rules that such airport operations-related incidents are beyond the control of airlines. Therefore, you are not entitled to a compensation. However, that doesn’t mean that the airline shouldn’t take care of you!

Strikes at London Gatwick

Airports employ a lot of people. That doesn’t mean that all of them are happy with their working conditions! As such, any airport can have its operations halted by a strike – and this means flight disruptions.

Air traffic controller strikes are likely the worst, as they can affect flights not only in the airport, but also those flying nearby. However, we have recently seen all sorts of other staff, from luggage handlers to security go on strike.

Regulation (EC) 261/2004 rules that airport staff strikes are outside of airlines’ control. Therefore, a flight delayed or cancelled for this reason is not eligible for flight compensation.

Bad weather conditions at London Gatwick

Planes might be big advanced, but they are not immune to all weather conditions. Therefore, terrible weather can result in flight delays out outright cancellations. These often happen in winter, when snow can easily mess things up.

Wind speed and visibility are some of the most common culprits behind weather-caused disruption. And just because the weather is clear at your airport doesn’t mean that it’s not terrible at your destination. If the airport you’re trying to fly to reports that weather there is unsuitable for flying, the airline can do little else but delay or cancel the strike.

As the airlines can’t control weather, Regulation (EC) 261/2004 judges them not to be responsible for flight disruptions that result in such cases.

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Was your flight disrupted?

Turn your delayed, cancelled or overbooked flight into a compensation up to €600!